ecc66b567676f0fc96692fd498b958f6The Lost Woman by Sara Blaedel

Goodreads rating: 3.77

Pages: 281 (Portuguese edition)

Genre: Adult, Contemporary, Thriller, Crime, Mystery, Nordic Noir

Date published: Nov 7th, 2014 (Denmark)

My rating: ★★★★☆

Goodreads // Buy this book: Paperback & Hardback

Synopsis

Shot with a hunting rifle through her kitchen window, the woman is dead before she hits the ground. Though murdered in England, it turns out that the woman, Sofie Parker, is a Danish citizen–one who’s been missing for almost two decades–so Louise Rick is called on to the case.

Then the police discover that the woman, Sophie, had been reported missing eighteen years ago by none other than Eik, Louise Rick’s police colleague and lover. Impulsive as ever, Eik rushes to England, and ends up in jail on suspicion of Sofie’s murder. Unsettled by the connection, and sick with worry for Eik, it falls to Louise to find the killer in what will become her most controversial case yet…

My review

I picked this book up on a whim when I was at a bookstore one day and I ended up really enjoying it.

The Lost Woman is the 9th book in the Louise Rick series, and yet you can totally read it without reading the previous ones. Of course, you don’t get to see the development of each character’s background story, but that doesn’t really affect your reading – and you can always pick up the rest of the series after.

I thought the plot was very nicely crafted, and I loved the way the characters were connected, and how we got to delve into one of the main characters’ emotional past. Speaking of characters, I really liked the way Blædel wrote them, they were quite mysterious, which I appreciated. That aspect made it so that you didn’t really know who to trust, although the author did sort of hint at the culprit at one point (they acted a bit weird).

One aspect I really loved was how the author presented a controversial issue – don’t want to spoil it for you – that is still being discussed today, and is one of the main subjects in the book. You can tell the author did a lot of research, in order to realistically present to us how the issue is handled by different people and in different countries. I also loved the solving of the case, I thought it was very clever, and it made perfect sense, which doesn’t always happen in crime books, does it?

My only issue with this book was how the pacing was consistent throughout the whole thing – a very nice pace, mind you – but as soon as we started figuring things out, everything happened too fast. A lot was happening simultaneously and at an exhaustive pace, which threw me off a bit. And just like that, the book is over and you’re already reading the epilogue. I do enjoy a fast-paced book, but I hate it when it gets too fast towards the end, to the extent that it confuses the reader.

As for the writing, I can’t really rate it because I read a translated version (I have yet to learn Danish), but I did like the style of the narration that the translator presented.

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My rating

In conclusion, I quite enjoyed “The Lost Woman”, with the exception of that aspect I mentioned earlier.

Zuky, you might like this one!

I also think it’s a nice Nordic Noir book for people who, like me, are just getting into the genre, and don’t really have that much experience with this kind of reading.

Writing – translation –
Characters 4-01
Plot 4-01
Pacing 3-01

Overall

3.66 stars


Have you read many Nordic Noir books? Which do you recommend? Let me know in the comments down below ♡

I hope you enjoyed reading my thoughts on The Lost Woman and if you’d like, check out my other book reviews!


Thank you so much for reading,
I’ll see you in my next post ♡